John B. Chane, 1963

Episcopal Bishop
While enrolled at Vermont Academy, John Bryson Chane was a student of many passions, including football and music. Music won out over academics, so upon graduation, John played in bands between New England and Ohio. After a few years, John realized he wanted more from life, and enrolled at Boston University.

With a desire to make a difference, John worked as an urban community organizer and was employed through the Boston Redevelopment Program, “Just-A-Start,” funded by HUD. During those years, John entered Yale Divinity School; served as a pastor in Erie, Pennsylvania, and Southborough, Massachusetts; was a consultant on religious affairs for the United States Olympic Committee during the 1980 winter and summer games; served as chaplain at the Lake Placid games; and served on many committees for the diocese of Massachusetts. The Episcopal Church next sent John to San Diego, California. He was an original member of the Diocesan PERCEPT team and coordinated “Church Without Borders,” a program linking the Diocese of San Diego with the Diocese of Western Mexico.

In 2002, the Rt. Rev. John Bryson Chane was consecrated as the Eighth Bishop of Washington, DC. As bishop, he serves 93 congregations and 45,000 members in the District of Columbia, and in Prince George’s, Montgomery, Charles and Saint Mary’s counties in Maryland. A liberal thinker, John fights for the acceptance of all Christians at the communion table, regardless of affiliation, economic status, or sexual orientation. He believes in the need to interpret the Gospel as culture changes, in housing for the homeless, and in building an education system that allows children alternatives to drugs and violence. John also lobbies for equality, human rights, and education on a global scale through his placement on several international task forces. He was recently appointed to serve on a global Anglican task force investigating human rights violations in the Kingdom of Swaziland, Africa, and has established a partnership with The Anglican Church of the Province of Southern Africa.

As John reflects upon his time at Vermont Academy, he remembers Coach John Lucy. I attribute whatever success I’ve had in my life, in part, to a man who loved VA, cared a whole lot about his players, and taught me that winning was not the most important thing in life.”
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